Julius Evola on Hermann Keyserling – Part 2

This is the second and final installment of Julius Evola‘s commentary on Hermann Keyserling from Saggi sull’Idealismo Magico. Evola refers to Keyserling’s “brilliant interpretation of the function of meaning, according to which understanding is removed from the rational and peripheral plane and compenetrated with the principle of deep self-realization and … Continue reading

Julius Evola on Hermann Keyserling – Part 1

Next: Hermann Keyserling Part 2 ⇒ This is part 1 of two on Julius Evola‘s interpretation of Hermann Keyserling, originally published in Saggi sull’Idealismo Magico. The School of Wisdom referred to was established by Keyserling in 1920 and is apparently still active today. Keyserling bases his philosophy on “understanding”, which … Continue reading

Julius Evola on Giovanni Gentile — Part 3

Next: Hermann Keyserling ⇒ This is the third and final installment of Julius Evola‘s commentary on Giovanni Gentile from Essays on Magical Idealism. Although it is highly technical, we can cut to the main point. First, there is the distinction between spontaneity and freedom. In a free act, “I” make … Continue reading

Julius Evola on Giovanni Gentile — Part 2

Next: Giovanni Gentile Part 3 ⇒ In this section, Julius Evola deals with the nature of thought itself. Thought cannot be the object of thinking, since it would then be just another thought. Rather, there must be something that transcends thinking, the “non-rational”. Nevertheless, the non-rational is not the same … Continue reading

Evola on Carlo Michelstaedter, Part 2

Previous: ⇐ Carlo Michelstaedter Part 1 Next: Giovanni Gentile ⇒ The is the seconde of two parts, in which Julius Evola details his intellectual debt to Carlo Michelstaedter. From Saggi sull’Idealismo Magico. In order to illuminate Michelstaedter’s central problem, it may be useful to connect the concept of insufficiency or … Continue reading

Evola on Carlo Michelstaedter, Part 1

Next: Carlo Michelstaedter Part 2 ⇒ The is the first of two parts, in which Julius Evola details his debt to Carlo Michelstaedter. “Persuasion”, for Michelstaedter, is being and “rhetoric” is non-being, or becoming. Hence, he is attempting to describe the man who is persuaded, i.e., the man who has … Continue reading

Contemporary Requirements for Magical Idealism

Next: Carlo Michelstaedter ⇒ [Evola] invests the dark matter of esoterism with a dialectic and discursive reflexion. (From Franco Volpi’s introduction to Magical Idealism.)   TRANSLATION of Chapter 6 of Essays on Magical Idealism (Saggi sull’idealismo magico) by Julius Evola. In this early book, the young Evola sketched out his … Continue reading

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